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8:00AM

The War Room - Theaters Aug. 28

Watch the teaser trailer for the new movie from the Kendrick Brothers (Fireproof & Courageous), WAR ROOM, which will be in theaters August 28.

warroomthemovie.com

8:00AM

Beyond the Mask: Behind the Scenes

Here is a sneak peek of a “behind the scenes” featurette about the visual effects in Beyond the Mask. This video is a small taste of the bonus features that will be available exclusively on the Beyond the Mask DVD…coming September 8th!

BeyondTheMaskMovie.com

8:00AM

Fixing Story Problems

It’s impossible to say what makes a film great. Useless to prescribe any rules, since often the best films break them anyway. A more helpful discussion, then, might be to talk about what makes a film bad — and what can be done about it (this is the helpful part).

Lately we’ve been reading Blake Snyder’s classic book on screenwriting, Save the Cat!, to see what lessons a major Hollywood screenwriter offers independent filmmakers like ourselves. One of the most useful sections comes toward the end, when Snyder discusses common story problems and what he suggests writers do about them. Even though we’re not particularly interested in writing the next Hollywood blockbuster, these tips were surprisingly great and helped clarify some story fundamentals in our minds. So we thought we’d share them.

...Read the full article here to find fixes for these common problem:

1. The Problem of the Passive Hero

2. The Problem of Talking the Plot

3. The Problem of Nothing on the Line

4. The Problem of One Thing After Another

5. The Problem of the Emotional Color Wheel

6. The Problem of Primality

4:37PM

CWVFF 2016 - Ticket Sale

2016 Christian Worldview Film Festival tickets are now available for $80 off the regular price for the first 100 tickets! This offer ENDS on Sunday, AUGUST 9TH or when 100 tickets are sold.

We will be lengthening the Filmmakers Guild and making the entire event 6 days long instead of 5!  
 
Now you will have more time to network with fellow filmmakers and glean from some of your favorite CWVFF speakers including:
 
Rich Christiano, Nathan Ashton, Stacie Graber, George Escobar, Brett Varvel, John-Clay Burnett, Rebekah Cook, Jurgen Beck, Ken Carpenter, John Fornof, Timothy Jones, Rich Swingle, Mimi Sagadin and more!

Here is how you can help:

In order to lock in these dates we need to put down a deposit on the Conference Center by August 10th.  The only way we can do that is if we can pre-sell enough Filmmakers Guild tickets at a reduced rate by this Sunday!
 
The Filmmakers Guild passes are $199 for all six days, but if you purchase them now you get all 6 days for just $119! That's $80 off!  That's better than any offer we were able to do last year, but this is only going to be available to the first 100 registrations.
 
In addition to the reduced ticket price you will also get a free copy of George Escobar's 500 page eBook "Filmmaking for Christians" and you will be entered into a drawing for a number of great prizes!
 
Here is what is included for $119.00

  • 2016 Film Festival & Filmmakers Guild Ticket ($80 off regular price!)
  • George Escobar's 500 page eBook "Filmmaking for Christians"
  • PLUS each registration will go into a drawing for a number of  giveaways including:
  • Grand Prize: George Escobar's 7 Course Screen Writing Webinar (A $200 Value!) - 1 available
  • A copy of the our documentary "Captivated" - 10 copies available
  • A copy of my new book "Media Choices: Convictions or Compromise?" - 10 copies available
  • A copy of the DVD "HERO" - 10 copies available
  • A copy of the DVD "Come What May" - 10 copies available
  • and more...

Buy your 2016 tickets here.

If you are not able to attend in 2016 or if you can't purchase a ticket at this time, but would like to help, you can make a donation toward this endeavor.  Donations of any size are a big help and are greatly appreciated!

8:00AM

You've Landed Your First Video Job

You’re fresh out of school. You’ve been waiting for this moment for four years, and now it’s happened: you’ve landed your first corporate client. What next? Here are some tips to help you kick things off.

Build your brand

By brand we mean how your company appears from the outside, and what it stands for. A strong brand makes you look credible and helps to create a memorable business that people want to be connected to. Pick a name that stands out, and is related to what you, in particular, offer. Using your own name as a brand is more personable but will potentially attract smaller clients. Also, consider the simplicity of the name: is it easy to remember the corresponding url or twitter handle?

Developing a visual identity is just as important, get a great logo and share it everywhere. Think about corresponding design elements (color, typography, shapes). Finally, a tagline goes hand in hand with your logo and is your promise to your audience - can you explain what you are and what you do in about 7 words?

Promote yourself

When you’re first starting out, you can’t just sit around and hope people will come to you. You need to build a credible online presence.

First, get your website set up. No html or java experience? Fear not. Companies such as Wordpress, Wix, or Squarespace offer stylish and easy-to-use pre-packaged sites.

Next, get your Facebook and Twitter (and other social platforms) presence going, and make sure you post to them regularly. Even if it’s just a “Hey, see what we just did for our latest client!”, or “Check out the new service we’re offering”. This way, clients are always being reminded you’re there and can watch you develop.

Finally, word of mouth is always the best advertising. Every time you deliver a project and see a smile on your client’s face, ask them if they know anyone who might need your services and encourage them to recommend you.

For a few more tips, check out 5 keys to growing your freelance business.

Get your business incorporated

This might sound like a boring bit of admin, but protecting yourself as an individual, or as a husband/wife/parent is critical. When you’re incorporated, if someone sues you for professional reasons, they will be suing the business, and your personal assets will be protected. As a small business owner, you are subject to some of the laws and tax regulations that apply to large corporations. In addition to incorporation, make sure you check out the tax obligations in your location.

Pick your software

While your expertise and comfort levels might guide your software decisions, your budget will also come into play. FCPX (Mac only) is a flat $300 fee, while both Adobe’s Creative Cloud and Avid Media Composer are available on a $50/month subscription plan. Keep in mind that some programs are Windows only (including DVD Architect, pretty much the last prosumer DVD authoring program).

To work out what you need and the best way of buying it, sit down and make a road map of the type of services you’re planning to offer in the first twelve months of your business. Then list the applications you’ll need to do each service. For example:

Jan – April:
Web file creation – Sorenson Squeeze, $X
DVD authoring – DVD Architect, $X
May:
3D animation – Cinema 4D, $X

You may decide that you won’t offer all services right off the bat, as they’ll require more cash up front on software. Update and refer to your roadmap regularly to prepare for the next phase of your business.

Storage

It’s crucial to choose the right storage platforms for the work that you’ll be cutting. Many new editors think, “I’ll just get a large system drive and edit off that!”. Bad idea. You should never have media on the same drive as your OS: if your hard drive is damaged, you’ll lose all your files. G-Raid Technology and La Cie are excellent starting places; they have a range of drives covering a selection of interfaces.

The demo

There is a slight difference between demo reels and a showreel, and both are important. A showreel showcases the range of work that you’ve done and is edited in a snappy, creative way. A demo reel shows the work you can do in more detail and with longer segments, giving clients a clearer understanding of your style of editing. Your demo reels will help potential clients decide if you’re the right fit for the post production on their next job. If you’re an editor that works on different types of productions, make sure you have demos that show each genre.

Manage client expectations

As soon as the project begins, you need to establish some guidelines to ensure things stay on track. Without these, you’ll be surprised at how quickly things can unravel. Develop a timeline and agree on a communication schedule (with all key stakeholders!) and milestone reviews  – this way the the client can leave you to do your work, knowing they’ll be brought in at critical junctures. Finally, once you’ve set attainable deadlines, stick to them. Never over promise and then under deliver – this is a sure recipe for disappointment all round.

Quoting and billing

Consider charging per project instead of per hour. This gives the client peace of mind around the project budget but also, if you work quickly and efficiently, means you don’t risk devaluing your expertise on an hourly rate. A Statement of Work shows that all parties have agreed upon the deliverables and the project price (and anything outside of that will increase the price of the project).

When billing, consider using invoicing software to give you a professional look and make sure everything is calculated correctly. Freshbooks or Xero will help track your clients and the amount of money you are owed. Make sure to include a due date and full details of your preferred payment method on every invoice you send.

Golden rule

Lastly, the most important thing to remember is never work for free. Your time is valuable. A credit in someone’s movie or TV show doesn’t pay your rent, or the lease on your equipment. Don’t be afraid to ask for what you feel you deserve. You might lose a few clients, but the ones you deliver for in exchange for a fair price, will be clients for life!

Kevin P McAuliffe is a three-time North American ProMax award-winning editor and has been a media composer editor for over 18 years. He is a senior editor at Extreme Reach Toronto, whose current clients include Paramount Pictures, Warner Bros. Pictures, Walt Disney Pictures and E1 Entertainment. Kevin can also be found helping out on Avid Community in the Media Composer and Symphony Get Started Fast forums.

(Article Posted by Wipster)

8:00AM

Woodlawn - Movie Trailer

What happens when football and faith come together in the most relevant, life-changing way possible? The answer to that question can be found in the upcoming feature film WOODLAWN. The Erwin Brothers (Moms' Night Out, October Baby) have partnered with Pure Flix (God's Not Dead, Do You Believe?) and Provident Films (Fireproof, Courageous) to present this undeniable true story surrounding the spiritual awakening that captured the Woodlawn High School football team in 1973.

Starring Jon Voight, Sean Astin, Nic Bishop, and newcomer Caleb Castille, WOODLAWN demonstrates what can happen when true love and unbridled unity meet at the 50-yard line. With the racially-charged early 1970s as its backdrop, WOODLAWN and its groundbreaking African American superstar Tony Nathan experience an unprecedented time of revival and reconciliation that ultimately leads to the largest high school game ever played in Birmingham.

Check out the powerful new trailer for WOODLAWN, coming to theaters nationwide October 16, 2015, and don’t miss out on an opportunity to share its message of hope with friends, family members and football fans alike. Get ready to see what happens WHEN GOD SHOWS UP!

woodlawnmovie.com

8:00AM

How to Light an Interview

Have you ever needed to do an interview in an area that made it super tough, for one reason or another?

While in a remote village of Nepal for #standwithme, we needed to interview a few girls at a rehabilitated slave center. It was a crew of two with some LED lights, limited access to power, and very little time and space. These interviews had to cut in with that of Lisa Kristine or the Harr family, interviews that we had crews of four to five on, tons of gear, HMIs to recreate a sunny day, and hours to setup.

But for these interviews it was two people with 30 minutes and lighting that looked closer to a flashlight than something you’d find on a film set.

Now of course we couldn’t make something out of nothing. These interviews wouldn’t look AS good as the ones with Lisa Kristine’s, but we did have to make sure they could cut into the same film and story. And to do that we really went back to the basics. We listened to the light and looked for what was there, how we could best use the environment, and then just broke the light down into its core components and made the most of each.

SWMInterviews

Both of these interviews were lit in a crunch in the same side of a bedroom in a remote Nepal village. They are simple but clean by following each step of the tutorial below. The window as a key, some diffusion to soften it, and then a small LED light to add some fill. But it’s the details that matter here, and that we’ll cover in the tutorial.

I can’t tell you how many times over the years we’ve seen people with huge crews and massive lights spend hours lighting an interview that could have looked stronger by just working with the window light that was there.

Sometimes, we just setup what we think we are supposed to for an interview. Or we feel bad if we don’t use our most expensive and coolest lights.

But, as with most skills, if we master the basics before moving up, we can often do much more and go much further (exactly the same scenario with people jumping into huge Steadicams before they knew the basics).

So today on the blog we have something that really goes back to the basics. How To Light An Interview. It’s a complete lesson from Story & Heart’s Academy Of Storytellers. It shows you how to get setup and get strong results right away. It also breaks it down in a way that is easy to remember and apply on every shoot.

....(Read the Full Article Here)

8:00AM

The War Room - Heart of the Movie

Alex and Stephen Kendrick discuss the next film by the Kendrick Brothers!

warroomthemovie.com

8:01AM

Adobe Premiere Pro - 2015

Premiere Pro features a new color workspace featuring the Lumetri Color Panel, which allows editors to manipulate color and light in new and innovative ways, at any point in the editing process, without leaving the application. Combining new color technology based on SpeedGrade with familiar Lightroom-style controls, applying simple looks and manipulating parameters to achieve the perfect aesthetic has never been easier, and you’ll see beautiful results in just a click or two. You can take it further with curves and hue/saturation controls, and the new Lumetri 3-way color corrector. And if you want to do more, you can use Direct Link to take your project into SpeedGrade for additional refinements.

Unsightly jump-cuts in talking head interview footage might just be a thing of the past with the addition of Morph Cut, which uses face tracking, frame interpolation, and some Adobe magic to create seamless transitions that previously would have seemed impossible.

The introduction of CC Libraries to Premiere Pro (shown in After Effects in the link) allows you to access and use looks and graphics wherever you are. Use the amazing Project Candy mobile technology to capture the look of a location or picture, jump into Premiere Pro’s Libraries panel and see the look sync’ed via Creative Cloud, and just drag it to a clip to apply. You can easily share looks and graphics from Photoshop and elsewhere between projects, team members, and across other Adobe applications for seamless access and collaboration.

An improved workflow to bring your video projects that you created on your phone from Premiere Clip, Adobe’s editing app for iOS devices, means you’re only two clicks from bringing your project into Premiere Pro to use professional editing tools.

You can now easily toggle between new task-oriented workspaces, optimized for the task at hand (whether it be editing, color work, and more), using the new workspace switcher.

As you’ve come to expect from Premiere Pro, you can work at any resolution without needing to transcode, and a host of newly supported native formats, including new support for Canon XF-AVC, and Panasonic 4K_HS, streamlining your path to getting creative.

And the features don’t stop there. Editors who work with Closed Captions will now be able to burn them into video on export, and a number of editing refinements like the new composite preview during trim, simpler keyboard-based numerical input, Source Settings now showing as Master Clip Effects, and improved AAF exports help you focus on simply making beautiful content. You’ll also find audio routing is easier thanks to improved audio routing UI, and an improved Audition workflow featuring Dynamic Link means moving between Premiere Pro and Audition is easier and faster than ever. Users of Windows-based touch devices will benefit from the first steps being taken towards a more touch-friendly editing experience, allowing editors to perform tasks like moving clips in the timeline and scrubbing the play-head by directly touching the screen. And editors who work with third-party I/O devices will experience significant Mercury Transmit performance enhancements.

One final piece of Adobe magic allows you to alter the duration of an export by up to 10% in either direction while maintaining quality. Time Tuner lets you target the precise duration of your required output without needing to perform time-consuming micro editing, by automatically adding or removing frames in areas of low activity, providing results of the highest possible quality for broadcast and elsewhere.
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(Source Article)

8:00AM

MWCFA - Online Academy

This year, the Online Academy is focused on two things: business and storytelling. Business, because you have to know how to run a successful business in order to be able to make a living at filmmaking on your own. And storytelling because in everything you do – whether it’s screenwriting, cinematography, or lighting – you’re working to tell a story, and that story needs to told well.